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THINGS TO DO IN LUXEMBOURG WITH KIDS

Luxembourg is one of the smallest countries in the world. It boasts a population of 500,000 residents and spans an area of just 1,650 km2. Walking around, it feels more like a large town than a country. The center of the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in its own right and you can find culture, history and beauty around every corner.

As well as picture-postcard enclaves you will also find aged fortresses and stunning castles, and it’s easy to visit Luxembourg by hopping across the border from the Netherlands or Belgium. We spent two days at a campsite just our of town and used public transport to explore. A really pleasant surprise, Luxembourg is a delightful place to visit.

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BEST TIME TO VISIT LUXEMBOURG?


There is no bad time to visit Luxembourg. School holidays are the most popular, with the best weather on offer in July and August. However, the good weather often extends into September and October.

Luxembourg is a popular Christmas and the New Year destination. With festivities marked with snow! Massive street parties and celebrations take place every year on June 23rd, ‘National Day’ which celebrates the Grand Duke’s birthday. The Grand Duchess’s birthday is celebrated on 23 January with fireworks and a parade.

BEST TIME TO BOOK FLIGHTS TO LUXEMBOURG?

There are multiple factors that influence the price of a flight so comparing airlines, departure airports and times can help keep costs down. Currently, May is the cheapest month to fly to Luxembourg, with flights ranging from £40 to £50. July is the most popular month, where you will see a big jump up to an average cost of £100pp. We recommend using Skyscanner as a starting place and then searching other providers to see if you can beat their price.

Tuesday is the most economical day to take a flight to Luxembourg. To get the best value, try booking a flight in the afternoon . Generally the prices will increase for flights in the mornings as these tend to have higher demand. If you’re visiting during a festival, make sure to book as early as you possibly can to avoid paying over the odds.

HOW LONG IS THE FLIGHT?

Average flight from London to Luxembourg: 1 hour 10 minutes

CURRENCY

The official currency of Luxembourg is Euros. You can pay for things using a credit card or visa card but you will be charged additional fees. Exchange rates vary, so be sure to check prior to your trip.The Bank of England has an extensive list that is updated every day. If you intend on using your credit charge or debit card, you may incur charges for payments and cash withdrawals. We often use the Post Office for our exchange or use ATM’s in our destinations.

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LUXEMBOURG AIRPORT

Luxembourg Airport is the main airport in Luxembourg. Previously called Luxembourg Findel Airport due to its location at Findel, it is Luxembourg’s only international airport and is the only airport in the country with a paved runway.

A free shuttle from Parking M will take you to the centre of Luxembourg. Or you will find several car rental companies within the airport, all of whom speak English. You will need a deposit and your passport/driving license.

VISA

If you hold a British Citizen passport, you don’t need a visa to enter Luxembourg. If you’re planning a stay of longer than 3 months, see our Living in Luxembourg guide and contact the Luxembourg Embassy if you have further questions.

ACCOMMODATION



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PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Since 1st March 2020, public transport in Luxembourg is free throughout the country and for all modes of transport – trams, trains and buses. The scheme applies to residents, cross-border commuters and tourists alike.

THINGS TO DO


EXPLORE THE OLD QUARTER


A city whose wall is a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. A place full of magic, history, artistic treasures and with the highest GDP per capita in the world. Discover Luxembourg with a walking tour and benefit from the insight of a local guide. They can share context you might not discover alone, before exploring this magical city independently at your own pace.

The walls are wide enough for a pram but some places are quite steep and are cobbled. The views are incredible and the walking tour was informative and it was nice to meet other travelling families and tourists. There are so many tales to accompany places around the City, that a walking tour is ideal for visitors interested in learning more about this unique place.

£6 | Walking City Tour


LE CHEMIN DE LA CORNICHE


Hailed as ‘Europe’s most beautiful balcony’, this pedestrian promenade winds along the course of the 17th-century city ramparts with views across the river canyon towards the hefty fortifications of the Wenzelsmauer (Wenceslas Wall). The rampart-top walk continues along Blvd Victor Thorn to the Dräi Tier (Triple Gate) tower, stretching 600m in total.

£6 | Luxembourg Walking Tour


GRUND


The Grund has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1994. Nested in the fortified lower town of Luxembourg, just a stone’s throw from the center, the Grund district is known for its cultural and architectural heritage. The cobbled streets dating from the 10th century, walls and buildings from the 14th century characterise the neighbourhood.

Historically, it was the most populated area in the seventeenth century. Today, the Grund is a district with less than 1,000 inhabitants and is preserved from traffic. It is a charming place, which beautifully combines its architectural heritage, culture, and places to go out.

£120 | Professional Photoshoot & Walking Tour


CASEMATES DU BOCK


The Bock Cliff in Luxembourg is known for its cannons and its fortifications and it is here that you can explore Casemates (a series of underground passages). These tunnels are an amazing feat of engineering as they stretch for 21 kilometers and are dug out of solid rock cliffs.

They were made with the intention of hiding soldiers as well as providing a place to stockpile horses and equipment. You can walk through many of the tunnels and at the top of the plateau you will find the crumbling ruins of a former castle which was only discovered as late as 1963.

You have to leave your pram at the entrance, but it is parked right in front of the ticket desk so security can keep an eye on it. Don’t leave valuables there and be sure to take your feeding/change equipment. We were mid tunnel when George decided he was hungry so had to give him a feed in underground!

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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND ART


The best place to learn about Luxembourg’s culture is the MNHA (for short) and entry is free! Located on the way to the Casemates du Bock, the building stands out due to its modern design. In addition to temporary themed exhibits, the museum features a permanent coins and medals collection and a robust display of archaeological artefacts dating back to the prehistoric era.

Three permanent collections are housed in the central building: Fine Arts, which provides an overview of European painting. The Coin Cabinet, which is a display of coins, medals, and money-related technology. And Archaeology, an exhibition of artefacts ranging from prehistoric to the Middle Ages, housed in an underground gallery space.


PALACE OF THE GRAND DUKES


The Palais Grand-Ducal is the official residence of the Grand Duke and royal family of Luxembourg. It is one of the most stunning feats of architecture in the City and dates back to the 16th century. The guards change regularly and patrol the grounds, which is entertaining to watch.

Built as a city hall during the Flemish Renaissance, the palace suffered greatly during World War II–the Nazis destroyed much of the original furniture and decor and used the building as a tavern. Today, the grand interior is open for tours, but only during the summer. Directly opposite is a famous hot chocolate bar and a restaurant, so if you are planning on eating, it could be nice to do it and take in the views and guards.


PFAFFENTHAL LIFT


The glass elevator connects the “Pescatore” park located in the city centre to the Pfaffenthal area at the bottom of the Alzette valley. The ride in the glass elevator features sweeping views (71m high) for pedestrians and cyclists alike. Using the elevator is free of charge!



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NOTRE DAME CATHERDRAL


Notre Dame Cathedral was built in the 17th century by Jesuit priests and still stands proud to this day. One of its signature features, is the north gate. The gate is baroque in style and is covered with pretty stained glass that dates from the 19th and 20th centuries.

As well as traditional structures you’ll find modern pieces of sculpture, as well as a famous statue of the Madonna and Jesus in miniature form. It is also famous for its crypt, which contains graves of members of the Luxembourg royal family and which is guarded by two lion statues.


WALK THE WALLS OF THE CORNICHE


In Luxembourg City you will find the Walls of the Corniche which look over the city down onto a valley. This is also the spot where the Gate of the Grund is located which was built in 1632 and there are a range of houses and other curiosities in the area such as St.Michael’s Church and the Abbey of Neumünster which has a famous pipe organ as well as a ‘black virgin’ from the 14th century.


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